Arleb by Nabad Online Exhibition. Supporting Artists in Lebanon.

We are more than thrilled to be launching Arleb with 62 selected artists, both established and emerging, and 514 curated artworks. Visit arleb.org and support artists in Lebanon!
For daily news and interviews, follow nabad.art on Facebook and Instagram.

#dar_alkalima_university #nabad #nabad.art #arleb.org #arleb @nabad.art @mitri.raheb @roulasalibi
and a big thank you to the amazing team of sprkl.co

Dr. Pamela Chrabieh in STARS Illustrated Magazine New York

STARS illustrated magazine February-March 2021 issue, Dossier Loubnan (Art book edition) is now available. Published by Times Square Press New York, and Stars Illustrated New York.

Interview with/Entretien avec Dr. Pamela Chrabieh, p. 84. About her art and the nabad.art program which she is managing in Lebanon for Dar al Kalima University College of Arts and Culture.
NABAD Program; The hope Lebanese artists were looking for.
https://bit.ly/39eXVtP

تفجير بيروت: حكاية أمل وألم … ورشة عمل تركّز على المتضررين واحتياجاتهم النفسيّة والاجتماعيّة

واستعرَضَت د. باميلا شرابيّة فكرة مشروع “نبض 2021” والذي يهدف الى اعادةِ احياءِ الواقع اللبناني من خلالِ الفن، حيث كانت كليّة دار الكلمة الجامعية للفنون والثقافة قد أطلقته قبلَ عدّة أيام

Read the full article: nidaalwatan, 09-12-2020

THE POWER OF ART IN TIMES OF UNCERTAINTY, by Dr. Pamela Chrabieh

With millions of people either in lockdown or on the front lines battling the COVID-19 pandemic, and continuous socio-economic and political crises in Southwestern Asia and North Africa, we all need a reminder that art can build bridges across differences, and relays messages of resistance, resilience and hope.

Audrey Azoulay, head of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) stated the following on the first celebration of World Art Day in April 2020: “Bringing people together, inspiring, soothing and sharing: these are the powers of art”. And these powers are needed today more than ever, whether to face divisions, or address self-isolation, precariousness, loss, traumas and vulnerability.

However, keeping the arts alive and kicking requires a multiform support of artists, arts organizations and creative enterprises, both emerging and established, marginalized and visible; it also requires listening to the diversity of artistic talents and promoting the democratization of art or access to art for all.

In that sense, Dar al Kalima University College of Arts and Culture has launched NABAD, an innovative program that encompasses art intervention, outreach, empowerment and art content production in Southwestern Asia and North Africa.

This program emerged in response to the August 4 port explosions in Beirut, and strives to become a beacon of support for artists and creative enterprises in the region, with a focus on marginalized arts and culture communities — youth, women, minorities, vulnerable groups, etc. 

The Beirut explosions left more than 200 dead, over 7,000 injured, 300 000 homeless, and they wrecked an already fragile art and cultural scene. Indeed, major art galleries and museums were either partly damaged or completely destroyed, along with countless smaller art venues and enterprises which play an important role in supporting their local communities: from providing a hometown feel for localities and personal customer service, to sparking healthy competition with larger competitors and encouraging innovation and creativity by adding unique spins on the artworks and activities they offer.

NABAD is a heartbeat embedded with the larger beating heart of local and regional arts and culture life, a vital impulse of hope amid war, destruction and instability, and a driving pulsation towards social and community transformation. In other words, it is a call to participate in a strong impetus for a culture of peace and social inclusion by tapping into creativity, as art brings us closer together and helps us live with one another.

It is also a call to pay tribute to and support artists who are engaged in transforming their communities and strengthening the links between artistic creation and society although they have to face multiple challenges during these unprecedented times.

Engaging with art and harnessing its powers are urgently needed, as many feel untouched by the problems of others, or are overwhelmed, disconnected, not empowered … And this is where art can make a difference, as Olafur Eliasson states: “art can mitigate the numbing effect created by the glut of information we are faced with today, motivate people to turn thinking into doing (…), encourage us to cherish intuition and uncertainty, and help us create points of contact that take us beyond an us-and-them mentality to a broader idea of what constitutes WE”.

By Dr. Pamela Chrabieh, Director of SPNC Learning & Communication Expertise, University Professor, & Visual Artist.

Source: executive-women.me, 01-12-2020

Lancement du programme Nabad — L’Orient-le-Jour

Le programme Nabad a comme objectifs en 2020-2021 de fournir un support financier à des artistes, des ONGs et de petites entreprises créatives qui ont été sévèrement touchés par les explosions du port de Beyrouth, et de promouvoir le rôle des arts et de la culture locale dans la transformation de la société en vue d’un meilleur avenir.

Pour plus d’informations: nabad.art
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nabad.art/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nabad.art/

Source: L’Orient-le-Jour, Beyrouth, 28 novembre 2020.

لا خيار لنا في زمن الدمار إلا الابتكار — janoubia.com

“نبض” برنامج مبتكر لكلية دار الكلمة للفنون والثقافة في نطاق التدخل والتوعية والتمكين الفني وإنشاء المحتوى في الفنون والثقافة، تم إطلاقه رداً على تفجيرات مرفأ بيروت في شهر آب ٢٠٢٠ ويهدف إلى دعم فنانين ومنظمات فنية ومؤسسات ابداعية صغيرة في لبنان ومنطقة جنوب غرب آسيا وشمال أفريقيا لتنفيذ أفكارهم ومشاريعهم الفنية والثقافية وتسويق أعمالهم الفنية

تأسست كلية دار الكلمة الجامعية للفنون والثقافة عام 2006 في بيت لحم – فلسطين. هذه الجامعة هي أول مؤسسة للتعليم العالي في فلسطين تركز على الفنون البصرية، والأدائية، والتراث الثقافي. استنادًا إلى خبرتها التي اكتسبتها على مدار 15 عامًا، افتتحت دار الكلمة في عام 2019 مركز تعليمي للفنون في غزة، وفي عام 2020 برنامج نبض في بيروت التي تتلخص أهدافه بما يلي: تمكين أصوات فنية ناشئة ومهمشة، دعم منظمات غير حكومية للفنون المحلية والمؤسسات الإبداعية، تعزيز فرص العمل المرتبطة بالفن، إنشاء محتوى نوعي للفنون والثقافة من أجل التوعية، وبناء شبكات ثقافية

وعن هذا المشروع قال الدكتور متري الراهب رئيس جامعة دار الكلمة في بيت لحم: “نبض هو مشروع ريادي يهدف الى خلق منصة للإبداع الفني في منطقة مأزومة وتمكين الطبقة المبدعة من الشباب في غرب آسيا وشمال أفريقيا للولوج إلى العالم الكبير. في منطقة قسمها الاستعمار لخدمة مصالحه، ارتأينا في جامعة دار الكلمة في فلسطين أن تقدم ولو الشيء اليسير للبنان الشقيق وبيروت الحبيبة من الخبرة التي جمعناها عبر سنوات الانتفاضة حيث تعلمنا ان لا خيار لنا في زمن الدمار الا الابتكار”. وكما أوضحت الدكتورة باميلا شرابيه مديرة البرنامج والآنسة رولا صليبي منسقة المشاريع: “نبض هو موجة متولدة في قلب الفنون المحلية والإقليمية والحياة الثقافية، ودافع حيوي للأمل والتحول الاجتماعي وسط الحروب والدمار والأزمات وانعدام الاستقرار”

رابط موقع نبض: https://nabad.art/

SOURCE: JANOUBIA.COM

Lancement du Programme Nabad pour les Arts et la Culture au Moyen-Orient

L’Université Dar al-Kalima pour les arts et la culture annonce le lancement de NABAD en réponse aux explosions du port de Beyrouth du 4 août 2020.

Ce programme innovateur en Asie du Sud-Ouest et en Afrique du Nord se veut de soutenir en 2020-2021 des artistes, des ONGs et de petites entreprises créatives au Liban, ainsi que de sensibiliser tant le public local que celui de la diaspora libanaise aux productions artistiques et culturelles émergentes ou marginalisées.

Un appel aux artistes est disponible sur la page de NABAD en vue d’exposer gratuitement leurs œuvres en ligne – consultez https://nabad.art/ pour plus d’informations.

SOURCE: AGENDA CULTUREL https://www.agendaculturel.com/article/lancement-du-programme-nabad

Interview with Pamela Chrabieh by Itsliquid Group, Venice – ItalyInterview


It's Liquid Logo

INTERVIEW: PAMELA CHRABIEH

Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Luca Curci talks with Pamela Chrabieh during ANIMA AMUNDI FESTIVAL 2019 – VISIONS at Palazzo Ca’ Zanardi.

Pamela Chrabieh is a Lebanese & Canadian Doctor in Sciences of Religions, scholar, visual artist, activist, university professor, writer and consultant. She has exhibited her artworks in Canada, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates and Italy, and has organized and participated in art workshops and art therapy sessions in North America, Europe and Western Asia. She was selected as one of the 100 most influential women in Lebanon in 2013, and won several national and regional prizes in Canada and the United Arab Emirates.

Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Image courtesy of Pamela Chrabieh

Luca Curci – What’s your background? What is the experience that has influenced your work the most?
Pamela Chrabieh – I was born and raised in the 1970s-1980s war in Lebanon. Growing up in war left me with a thirst to discover the truth behind the endless years spent in shelters and displacement, the survival techniques I learned, such as how to avoid snipers and land mines, the suffering following the destruction of our houses and the horrific deaths of loved ones, the fascination with war games I used to play, and the hours spent with my parents trying to look for bread. War has definitely marked my identity, world vision, and visual expression, but also my journeys and experiences at the crossroads of several countries, cultures and religions.

LC – Which subject are you working on?
PC – Mainly, war and peace as a general subject. Sub-subjects include: Dialogue, Human Rights, Gender Equality, Freedom of Expression, Cultural interpenetrations, Inclusion, etc.

LC – What is your creative process like?
PC – My visual art accompanies my writing, is influenced by it and influences it. And both creative journeys are closely linked to my personal experiences. These experiences should be powerful enough to push me to express myself me such as violence, separation, exile or death. I rarely produce content when I’m going through a status quo. And I rarely follow a strict path to create combinations of words, forms, colors and energies. Emotions and ideas progressively intermingle, and ultimately incarnate. I don’t see the creative journey as a series of specific steps set in stone, from preparation to implementation, but a multilevel construction, deconstruction and reconstruction of mental, physical and spiritual dynamics.
LC – Are your artworks focused on a specific theme?
PC – My artworks are a certain reflection of my journey as a resilient human being, a war survivor who is relentlessly searching for inner peace and peace with others, so that the vicious cycle of war breaks.

Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Image courtesy of Pamela Chrabieh

LC – How is being an artist nowadays?
PC – As I see it, being an artist nowadays is being (or should be about being) engaged in the production and dissemination of counter-cultures facing hegemonic cultures. It’s also being kind of a neo-renaissance human being, actively participating in building bridges across cultures and working towards more inclusive societies. Beyond a mere profession or a simple expression of one’s emotions, making art is and should be about living it and creating connections through it.

LC – Do you agree with our vision of art and what do you think about the theme of the festival?
PC – Definitely, and as previously mentioned, it is at the heart of my approach and quest. Anima Mundi symbolizes connections between cultures and religions; the contemporary and the traditional; the physical and the mental; the visible and the invisible; the past, present, and future; the logos (word) and the eikon (image); humanity, the natural and the spiritual, etc.

Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Image courtesy of Pamela Chrabieh

LC – What is the message linked to the artwork you have shown in this exhibition? How is it connected to the theme of the entire festival?
PC – War disconnects lives, memories, and experiences by creating endless cycles of violence, murderous identities, and wounded memories. I have come to believe that these memories are inevitably transmitted from generation to generation in private and public spaces, and that socio-political conviviality and peace need both individual and national healing processes. Or else, the load of traumas that we carry will prevail, fueled by the continuous local and regional crises and State-sponsored amnesia. Contrary to war, peace is the art of connecting. It is a continuous process encompassing historical subjectivities and energies in interpenetrative modes; a process of interacting dynamics, fragmented and common truths, voices, paths, and pathos.
A Duwama (spiral or vortex) is a visualization of this peacebuilding process. It symbolizes life versus death, positive movement towards the manifestation of connections, and therefore, towards forgiveness, healing, and conviviality.
Every one of my Duwamas is a story of transformation, from a shattered and disconnected situation, event, emotion or experience, to a connected realm.

LC – What do you think about ITSLIQUID Platform?
PC – It’s a platform that translates across diverse channels and contributes to transnational creative communication. It pushes the envelope and helps artists who think outside the box connect and discover the richness of their differences.

LC – Did you enjoy cooperating with us?
PC – Yes, and I hope we will pursue this cooperation.

Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Image courtesy of Pamela Chrabieh
Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Image courtesy of Pamela Chrabieh
Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Image courtesy of Pamela Chrabieh
Interview: Pamela Chrabieh
Image courtesy of Pamela Chrabieh

Source: https://www.itsliquid.com/interview-pamela-chrabieh.html

Artist Pamela Chrabieh’s “Peace Collection” in Indelible Dubai

I was born and raised in the 1970s-1980s war in Lebanon. My experience as a war survivor has marked my writing and art, as has fueld my quest for peace.

As I see it, peace is not only about ceasefires, the end of bloodshed, the absence of hostilities, and a state of mutual concord between governments, as war is both “physical” and “psychological”.

Peace is about accountability for violence, openness, generosity, clemency, and catharsis.

Peace is and should be a transformation process within mindsets, a celebration of interconnected life and unity in the diversity of complex identities.

As long as the legacy of violence is not addressed within ourselves and our societies, we will remain lost, cut off from connection, living in a never-ending apocalypse of carnages and tortured souls and bodies.

Dr. Pamela Chrabieh is a scholar, writer, visual artist, and activist. Author of several books and papers with a 20+ year experience in higher education, communication, content creation, and the arts, she has exhibited her artworks in Canada, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, and Italy. Previously Associate Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at the American University in Dubai, she currently owns and manages a Beirut-based company offering expertise in Learning and Communication. 
http://pamelachrabiehblog.com and http://spnc.co

Source: Indelible

CAFCAW Workshop – Towards an Inclusive Society in Lebanon?

Christian Academic Forum for Citizenship (CAFCAW) 4th workshop in Beirut-Lebanon. Hotel Monroe, September 28, 2019.

Introduction: Rev. Victor Makari and Ms. Maya Khadra.
Dr. Pamela Chrabieh – presentation: “What can be done to make our society more inclusive?”.
Mr. Alexandre Paulikevitch – testimonial: “The challenges of being a male choreographer in Lebanon”.
Mr. Cyril Badaoui – testimonial and presentation: “Talking about including people with mental health disorders”.
Ms. Maya Khadra – presentation: “About Instrumentalization of Minorities Narratives”.
Mr. Elie Elias – presentation: “Inclusiveness in Great Lebanon of 1920”.

“What can be done to make our society more inclusive?”
By Dr. Pamela Chrabieh

Positive vibes, fruitful dialogue, critical thinking, and a beautiful blend of identities united in their differences around a common goal: building a better inclusive society.